Avid4 Memoir

Ahmad Ardalan

http://www.ahmadardalan.net/

Baghdad: The Final Gathering

“Wars, an embargo, and forbidden love in this once peaceful city…”

With the drums of war just weeks away, Omar invites all those closest to his heart for lunch at his lavish villa overlooking the Tigris River of Baghdad. He can’t help but smile at the faces that have graced his eventful life that spans from an interesting childhood, the two Gulf Wars, and the inhumane embargo that crippled the nation. Loved ones come together, probably for the last time, in the city their ancestors called Baghdad or Baghdadu, “God’s Gift.”
Memories upon memories linger in Omar’s head. He has survived times of struggle, holding on to hope and love along the way. As he reflects on his journey, as a man destined to live a hard life in tumultuous times, he ponders a clouded future, on the brink of unknown change.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01K4YX4V8


Michelle Balge

Home

Michelle Balge is a mental health advocate, web designer, and animal lover. She has won awards thanks to her dedication to mental health, and has spoken about her experiences to students, the community, and professionals in the field. Michelle holds an Honours BA in Sociology with a Concentration in Critical Animal Studies, and will receive a Web Design Graduate Certificate in June, 2018. She was born and raised in Ontario, Canada, with a taste of city and small-town life. A Way Out gives an unfiltered look into the life and thoughts of a young woman, Michelle, experiencing depression and social anxiety. She shares her experiences in a way that allows others to go along for the ride with her: the highs, the lows, and the amusingly unexpected. Beyond the haunting honesty, A Way Out delivers heart, humour, and hope.

http://myBook.to/AWayOut


Lonna Cottrell-Thompson

http://lonnacottrellthompson.com

Everyday Is Like Sunday: A Memoir

After graduating high school in the early 1990s, Lonna finds herself trapped at her parents’ home in a tiny, muskrat-ridden, New Jersey town, enduring community college, cutting her split ends, and hoping for near death. All the while, an ominous black cloud and an obsessive best friend stalk her. Unlike her ex-boyfriend, she opts against a restraining order (although every second, she questions this decision).
Having recently sworn off all men, Andy enters Lonna’s chemistry class and lures her in with rubber gloves, lyrics from The Smiths, and the particles of life that radiate from his being. What happens next makes it hard for her to believe that her existence is not cursed. Destiny, coincidence, or a lesson in statistics—life has a sick sense of humor.


Laura Eckert

Most of us have experienced hardship and regret. Whether or not we allow them to define how we live today is up to us. Just Another Girl’s Story, A Memoir on Finding Redemption, shares with the reader how I was able to persevere and find happiness from a past filled with mistakes. I wrote from my heart and in an honest and forthcoming manner. The intent of my book is not to shock the reader or embarrass my husband or family who was involved with the mistakes I made in my teenage years. Rather, the intent is to give hope to others and help shed light on a darkness that all too often prevails in a life filled with sadness, regret and shame. It takes effort; however, we can overcome mistakes and find true forgiveness and happiness. My story shares how I achieved both and ultimately reached redemption.

http://amzn.to/2jiimzn


Jvonne Hubbard

White Sheets to Brown Babies is a memoir of the life of Jvonne Hubbard, a little girl who was raised to hate minorities through the indoctrination of her father, who was the Grand Dragon of a North Carolina faction of the KKK. It includes tales of living through a lifetime of dysfunction, violence and terror at the hands of both her father and other nefarious individuals who would seek to perpetuate the cycle. More importantly though, it is also a story of how they did not succeed in this hateful quest, as Jvonne struggled on and through to the other side to embrace love, laughter and the pursuit of personal happiness. Part of this amazing transformation even led to her adoption of a biracial infant, an event that served both as a healing elixir to her soul and a grandiose “!#%& you” to all the ugliness that hate brings.


Sevda Khatamian

http://www.sevdak.com

Sevda Khatamian, nineteen eighty-nine, her family was already living in Tehran when she was born in the month of July. Although her parents were in touch with friends and other members of the family, it was mostly the four of them hanging out together. Her father used to run his own business and her mother worked in a hospital. Later she became a lawyer. Soheil, her older brother, moved abroad right after he graduated from high school. Sevda took the same path and moved out of the country by the time she was eighteen. After six years of living in Ankara, studying, working, and eventually living an unemployed life concentrated on personal creative projects, she decided to move to Istanbul, and discover life on another level, and back up new experiences for the future. She now travels as an artist in residence, and lives in different countries for short periods of time. She believes creativity dawns as she moves along with the road.

Morning People is a memoir, selective series of moments of an everyday life in an endless city, with friends living along the same path, and unexpected incidents along the way.


Collette McLafferty

Confessions of a Bad, Ugly Singer

In April of 2014, former edibleRed vocalist Collette McLafferty had the shock of her life when a gig in a P!NK cover band dragged her into a $10,000,000 lawsuit. The Plaintiff, a personal injury attorney who once played drums for Michael Bolton, had a dispute with her band leader claiming he stole the lawyer’s idea to start Long Island’s first P!NK cover band. Although she had never met the attorney, McLafferty found herself named in the 112-page complaint. Stunned to learn she could be in a years-long court battle, Collette made the difficult decision to take her case to the press. She made a late night phone call to The New York Post in hopes of leaving a message. To her surprise, a copy boy was eating lunch at the Tip Desk during the graveyard shift. Although the dispute was mostly between the two men, Collette woke up to the headline “Singer Sued for Being Too Old and Too Ugly for P!NK Cover band” in the paper. The sensationalized headline told a story of a singer who was so “old, ugly and untalented” that her one-night performance prompted the lawyer to sue. This “fake news” version of events went viral worldwide, garnering coverage in Time, Yahoo News and Brietbart. The headlines alleged she“ruined” the P!NK cover band with her inferior looks and singing, triggering a deep depression. Determined to find justice, McLafferty fought the case and eventually introduced “Collette’s Law” with the help of The Lawsuit Reform Alliance of New York and Assemblyman Luis Sepulveda. “Confessions of a Bad, Ugly Singer” documents the emotional two-year journey of navigating the legal system, while embarking on a quest to clear her name.


Doug Oudin

https://www.amazon.com/Doug-Oudin/e/B00J6ELD5C

Doug Oudin, author of ‘Between Two Harbors, Reflections of a Catalina Island Harbormaster’ (his memoir), and ‘Five Weeks to Jamaica’, a seafaring novel, is a former harbormaster on Catalina Island. He wrote a column for the Catalina Island Newspaper for twenty-one years, and also wrote for the Log Newspaper. Now living in Grants Pass, Oregon, he has been married to the love of his life, Maureen for thirty-eight years. He has two sons, Trevor and Troy. The sea is his earthly passion.

Checkout over 50 Five Star Reviews on Amazon for my first book, a memoir, ‘Between Two Harbors’. Over 30 Five Star Reviews for 2nd book, ‘Five Weeks to Jamaica’, a seafaring adventure.


Tim Rees

http://www.lifeisart.co.uk

Hi, I’m Tim Rees. My background is BBC drama and before that the military. You can read about my life in the army in my memoir, In Sights: The Story Of A Welsh Guardsman, published by The History Press in 2013.

I left the BBC to focus on writing my own scripts and ended up writing the novel first so my story is set firmly on the page – my experience with the BBC taught me scripts are rewritten and change from the original script due to budgets, director’s idea’s and perspectives and then the actors come in with their own ideas on the character they’re playing. Making a film is an intensely creative process and it is a process I love, but after finishing my first novel, which is Raw Nerve, I knew I’d been born to be a novelist first and foremost, mainly because the creative intensity is doubled and my relationship with the characters is so much more real than working on a script where it’s necessary to leave it to the director and actors to flesh-out character.

I realised indie publishing is now at a professional standard and want to be a part of this new revolution. So now I’ve recently republished Raw Nerve to add to Delphian and WTF.